Typographical Error may trash your job application

 

Can One Error Cost You a Job Offer?

Can One Error Cost You a Job Offer?

You just hit “send”, and an error that was invisible a nanosecond ago looks like it’s in a 50-point font. Now you fear that a single typo will be judged so harshly that you’ve blown this opportunity.

I spent 5 years directing the research department of a professional accounting association. We printed more than 15,000 copies of our 300 page research studies in one print run for distribution to our members. Thousands of hours annually, in a pre-PC era, were devoted to ensuring that no errors survived our scrutiny. So how did I respond to typos in the applications I reviewed? I hired very bright people because I needed to know that they could understand difficult subject matter and communicate effectively with authors and the practicing accountants who served on review committees to vet the content of our various publications. Luring bright accounting graduates away from public accounting firms isn’t easy. I already had Cecil, an outstanding proofreader. People who can find typos aren’t scarce. So a typo would be discussed in the interview, along with other deficiencies that had been circled in red, but one lone typo wouldn’t discourage me from inviting an otherwise strong candidate to an interview. But a cavalier response to my mention of any error would definitely concern me.

I rarely received more than 20 credible applications but that wouldn’t be the reality today. Let’s suppose you and 500 other candidates submitted your applications by email in response to a typical job posting. The first screening will be performed by a junior staff person who is looking for a handful of key words or a software program that does the same. If your application didn’t nail most of the qualifications the job posting specified it will be rejected at that stage anyway. If your application is forwarded to a hiring manager and the rest of your application is very carefully prepared, your sole error may be noted but considered alongside other factors. If the duties of the position involve writing for external parties or you have claimed outstanding writing skills as one of your qualifications, it’s likely to be taken more seriously.

So if you don’t hear back from them, don’t sweat the typo. It’s not the typo that sent the application to the trash. It was your weak application. The process that creates a well-tailored application doesn’t start the afternoon of the submission deadline and leaves time for careful proofreading. It’s rare that an amazing resume/cover letter contains a typo. And there’s never more than one.

Keyboard error image courtesy of Shutterstock.

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