Tag Archives: Microsoft

“Credential Yourself” on Microsoft Office Skills

credential yourself

Can You Credential Yourself?

Responsibility for credibly communicating your competence in advanced Microsoft Word Skills is entirely in your hands.

Fortunately, even if you can’t point to a fistful of recently-completed certificates, you can quickly create effective documentation of those essential skills and credential yourself.

If you follow the steps I will lay out for you, you will never need to worry that you will be over looked for promotion or have your job application tossed out simply because you learned barely enough skills to get by in fulfilling your current responsibilities.

And you can do that without spending a single dime!

Can you really “Credential Yourself”?

You could just create a nice colorful certificate but that would have about as much credibility as a “World’s Greatest Dad” t-shirt! But you can prepare something at least as effective and more relevant and current within groupings of skills that are generally considered to be basic, intermediate, or advanced skills in Microsoft Word.

You can start with the Advanced Microsoft Word Checklist that I have provided in the free resources section. Then once you have satisfied yourself that you can perform all of the listed tasks, you need to decide how you will substantiate that claim as needed when you are challenged in a job interview. Continue reading

Document your Advanced Microsoft Word Skills

I frequently see resumes from job applicants claiming Advanced Microsoft Word skills. When such a high level of proficiency seems highly improbably given their previous work experience and education, I am very skeptical. When I have doubts and the answer is important to me, I ask questions. I want to know what specific things you can do on the job tomorrow.

Document Your Advanced Word Skills

Advanced Word Skills – Really?

Many job postings ask for advanced skills beyond what is essential, but that doesn’t really matter. When you are asked in a job interview some sort of vague question about your Microsoft Office skills, you still need to nail it convincingly.

That is the reason I created the checklists that are now available in the MS Office Skills Checklists section. By making sure that you know exactly what advanced skills are, you can avoid an awkward conversation that doesn’t answer the question. You don’t want either error. You don’t want to be embarrassed when you learn that you actually don’t have any advanced skills. Pretending you have skills that you don’t makes for an entertaining movie, but I think the thrill of the experience falls short of that in real life. Continue reading

What Credentials on Microsoft Word Skills can you offer?

What evidence of your Microsoft Word skills could you offer in response to job interview questions?

“Pretty good, I guess” isn’t very precise, but without advance preparation, a mumbled vague response is the best you have.

You don’t even know exactly what advanced skill levels are for this particular interviewer and you don’t want to reveal your ignorance by asking. You don’t know exactly what they need you to be able to do. Very often, the interviewer doesn’t really know either! So they wait to see what you say and write that down and go on to the next question.

You are justifiably proud of your accomplishments and references and university degree. But wouldn’t it be beneficial to state very precisely what things you can do with Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint  Access, Publisher and Outlook?

What if you could say “I have all the Intermediate skills for Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Outlook and basic skills for Access and Publisher. I have already sent you a PDF file that lists my Microsoft Office software skills in detail, along with a series of documents and projects that together are my “credential”. Continue reading

Microsoft Word 2010 Basic Skills Checklist for Job Seekers

I have been delighted by the response to an earlier post Job interview questions on Microsoft Office skills, which I wrote when I discovered that very little material is available to help job seekers communicate their Microsoft Office skills.

It is not at all unusual for job postings to include the following item in the qualifications section.

Because it wasn’t easy to find a simple list of what skills would be included in “Advanced Skills”, I decided to step in to make a contribution. In that post I addressed the need for a simple checklist of skills with Microsoft Word, and other Office software at the basic, intermediate and advanced level. The response to that post has been remarkable. Today I am further addressing that need by releasing the first in a series of checklists in the resources section of this site. Please feel free to pass any of these checklists along to anyone who can benefit from this tool.

Word 2010 capture for blog

The full Microsoft Word 2010 Basic Skills Checklist is available in the resources tab above or by clicking on the hyperlink. Also available are the Microsoft Outlook 2010 Basic Skills Checklist and the Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 Basic Skills Checklist.

Enjoy and let me know if it is helpful!