Tag Archives: “job interview questions”

Prepare for the Difficult Person Job Interview Question

I never met a man I didn’t like. Will Rogers

Inquiring employers want to know. How do you handle difficult people in the workplace? You can’t get away with a nice story about an annoying boss and now you work together in uninterrupted harmony.

handle the difficult person

Can You Handle this Difficult Person?

Forget about claiming that you have never met a difficult person unless your name is Will Rogers. The interviewer knows exactly what difficult person you will encounter your first week.

Last post, I laid down some background on why some people find you difficult and that other guy really grates on you. Given your temperament, entirely predictable. Now we can build on that foundation to accomplish two objectives.

First. we want to effectively relate to difficult people. Second, we want to communicate those skills to a prospective employer in a way that reassures them.

That is one of my consistent themes in this blog and my other material. I don’t just want to convince the employer that I can handle difficult people by offering one isolated, contrived story.

I want to be effective because I have learned how to respond to difficult people in a way that prevents any conflict from sabotaging my success and the organizations interests.

Then as I continue to do so mindfully, I accumulate a repertoire of relevant stories that I can tell very naturally.

Continue reading

How do you Handle the Difficult Colleague?

Are you prepared for the “difficult colleague” job interview question? Expect the interviewer to ask for an instance when you dealt with a difficult person to get a handle on your interpersonal skills. Don’t just count on winging it unless you have prepared stories of past successes.

Do you have a great interview story of how you used your skills to handle a difficult person? Can you describe your approach? It is best to start your preparation for this question by developing a simple approach that you can apply consistently. That way your interview answer will be clear and easy to follow and will be more credible to the interviewer. After all, if you just improvised, how can the prospective employer believe that your lovely story conveys the way you might handle a similar situation in the future?

You Need a Strategy for Handling a Difficult Colleague

Spot the Difficult Colleague

Spot the Difficult Colleague

Common strategies usually begins with first informing  the other person that what they are doing is a problem for you. If that’s not successful, you may need to involve other. In exceptional cases, more formal actions may become necessary. In the case of an abusive co-worker, that’s prudent advice, but not an ideal story for a job interview!

You don’t want to imply that every awkward or frustrating interaction with a fellow employee ends up with a meeting with HR! Whatever story you tell will leave them with the impression that you handle all situations in that same manner. Choose that story carefully!

First, lets explore why someone seems “difficult” to you.  Continue reading

“Credential Yourself” on Microsoft Office Skills

credential yourself

Can You Credential Yourself?

Responsibility for credibly communicating your competence in advanced Microsoft Word Skills is entirely in your hands.

Fortunately, even if you can’t point to a fistful of recently-completed certificates, you can quickly create effective documentation of those essential skills and credential yourself.

If you follow the steps I will lay out for you, you will never need to worry that you will be over looked for promotion or have your job application tossed out simply because you learned barely enough skills to get by in fulfilling your current responsibilities.

And you can do that without spending a single dime!

Can you really “Credential Yourself”?

You could just create a nice colorful certificate but that would have about as much credibility as a “World’s Greatest Dad” t-shirt! But you can prepare something at least as effective and more relevant and current within groupings of skills that are generally considered to be basic, intermediate, or advanced skills in Microsoft Word.

You can start with the Advanced Microsoft Word Checklist that I have provided in the free resources section. Then once you have satisfied yourself that you can perform all of the listed tasks, you need to decide how you will substantiate that claim as needed when you are challenged in a job interview. Continue reading

5 Reasons Microsoft Office Skills Need Proof

Proving Microsoft Word or Excel Skills to an employer even before they call can boost your credibility.

Prove your skills with a checklist

Prove your skills with a checklist

Most job postings specify Advanced Microsoft Office Skills, but not every interviewer confirms those skills for every applicant by asking a specific question.  But there are situations where they will need to know that you really have those skills or are just gambling that they won’t ask or will accept an evasive or vague answer.

When your Microsoft Office Skills need proof, nothing less will substitute.

Begin by clarifying in your own mind exactly what is included in an advanced level of skills and then make sure you can actually perform them!

Here are 5 situations when vague, unsupported responses to job interview questions just won’t do and your Microsoft Office Skills need proof.

1. Your MS Office skills are better than your work history suggests

If you have lots of relevant experience in positions requiring Microsoft Office skills, the interviewer may not ask you about them.

On the other hand, if very basic skills are likely all that’s needed in your current position and the employer needs advanced proficiency, they will be more skeptical and require evidence. and that just might mean they don’t invite you for an interview.  Continue reading

What Credentials on Microsoft Word Skills can you offer?

What evidence of your Microsoft Word skills could you offer in response to job interview questions?

“Pretty good, I guess” isn’t very precise, but without advance preparation, a mumbled vague response is the best you have.

You don’t even know exactly what advanced skill levels are for this particular interviewer and you don’t want to reveal your ignorance by asking. You don’t know exactly what they need you to be able to do. Very often, the interviewer doesn’t really know either! So they wait to see what you say and write that down and go on to the next question.

You are justifiably proud of your accomplishments and references and university degree. But wouldn’t it be beneficial to state very precisely what things you can do with Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint  Access, Publisher and Outlook?

What if you could say “I have all the Intermediate skills for Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Outlook and basic skills for Access and Publisher. I have already sent you a PDF file that lists my Microsoft Office software skills in detail, along with a series of documents and projects that together are my “credential”. Continue reading

Prospective employers want you to communicate your qualifications clearly

If you submit 10, 20 or more job applications every week without response, you are not alone and it’s your job to figure out why.

Are you treating the job search as a numbers game, like telemarketing? If I just send more applications, sooner or later it is inevitable that I will rise to the top of the pile. Or do you believe those who say “nobody gets hired from online job postings”. If that was true, how long would employers continue to accept online submissions? Not very long.

magnifying glass

Communicate Your Skills Clearly

Not every opening that is posted online is filled from online applicants but some are. If you aren’t among the winning pllicants, it may have something to do with how you are applying, but you may be perplexed as to what to change.

Do you understand the hiring process from the perspective of an employer that receives thousands of applications? Often its a junior staff member who reduces the pile to a manageable number. It’s easier than you think. Just discard applications that don’t mention the key words related to the required qualifications. Then calls are made to conduct an initial screening interview or to schedule an interview. So what if that prospective employer called the top 20 applicants but your phone didn’t ring? And what if that happened 50 times every week? Continue reading

Microsoft Word 2010 Basic Skills Checklist for Job Seekers

I have been delighted by the response to an earlier post Job interview questions on Microsoft Office skills, which I wrote when I discovered that very little material is available to help job seekers communicate their Microsoft Office skills.

It is not at all unusual for job postings to include the following item in the qualifications section.

Because it wasn’t easy to find a simple list of what skills would be included in “Advanced Skills”, I decided to step in to make a contribution. In that post I addressed the need for a simple checklist of skills with Microsoft Word, and other Office software at the basic, intermediate and advanced level. The response to that post has been remarkable. Today I am further addressing that need by releasing the first in a series of checklists in the resources section of this site. Please feel free to pass any of these checklists along to anyone who can benefit from this tool.

Word 2010 capture for blog

The full Microsoft Word 2010 Basic Skills Checklist is available in the resources tab above or by clicking on the hyperlink. Also available are the Microsoft Outlook 2010 Basic Skills Checklist and the Microsoft PowerPoint 2010 Basic Skills Checklist.

Enjoy and let me know if it is helpful!

6 Job interview questions a blogger should welcome

We all dread certain job interview questions, but with a good answer ready you can actually look forward to any question.

Successfully launching a blog is not easy and just the fact that you have a blog that is in any way career related gives you a conversation starter and icebreaker. But your blog can provide much more than that. Here are a few questions that you can respond to by drawing from your blogging experiences:

Provide an example of your problem solving skills:

If you have successfully launched a blog and sustained it for a significant amount of time, you have solved many problems. So every time you solve a significant problem, write down a short description. Note the nature of the problem and the implications it has for your blog’s availability or effectiveness. Describe exactly your problem solving process. what you did to solve the problem (e.g. use Google, phone a friend etc.). Specify clearly the outcome of the action you took and what you learned if anything. Tell the whole story in less than 60 seconds if possible in a way that is easy to understand. Continue reading

Job interview questions on Microsoft Office skills

Job interview questions on Microsoft Office skills

Job interview questions on Microsoft Office skills

As I reviewed a resume recently with a young person in preparation for anticipated job interview questions, I encountered the following item in the qualifications section.

  • Advanced skills in Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint and Access

Given her limited work history, I knew prospective employers would doubt that her Microsoft Office skills were at the advanced level she claimed. I asked if she could prove advanced skills. Could she demonstrate those skills if requested during a job interview? Not only did she not have a way to prove that she had Advanced Microsoft Word skills, but she could not name one such skill. She was not prepared to handle what were highly predictable job interview questions in her line of work. Notice that I didn’t say she didn’t actually have advanced skills, but that she wasn’t ready to support her claims.

Exactly What Are Advanced Microsoft Word Skills Anyway?

Do you know what skills a prospective employer would expect if you claimed on your resume to have Advanced Microsoft Word Skills? How would you answer job interview questions about your proficiency in Microsoft Word? Could you prepare a table of contents, footnotes and endnotes for a document with 20 chapters and 200 pages? How about “managing and tracking document changes, using highlights and comments”? I’m not asking whether you could run to the library on the way home and grab a book on Word skills. I mean if at the end of a job interview, they stuck you in a room with a computer, could you demonstrate those skills right now? What about Microsoft Word 2010?

Most Intermediate Microsoft Word skills, such as creating and formatting complex tables, would be a stretch for many of us unless they had been previously required in our employment. It’s not a question of whether you could easily get up to speed on these skills if you turned out to need them after you were hired. Most of us could do that. But what if many of the jobs you are looking for all say that they want Advanced Microsoft Office proficiency but you don’t yet have them?

Show Your Microsoft Word Skills with 5 Simple Strategies

  • Use research tools, including information interviews with current company contacts to identify exactly what the employer does require for the position you are seeking.
  • Come prepared to the job interview with checklists that honestly reflect your current skill levels with Microsoft Office suite. Include that one page in your portfolio. Some organizations ask for advanced Microsoft Office suite skills for every job posting, but it’s not likely they actually need them. If possible,
  • Revise your resume to honestly describe your current skills, such as Intermediate Microsoft Word and Microsoft Excel and Beginner Microsoft PowerPoint and Access. That should seem more credible than a claim of advanced skills across the entire Microsoft Office Suite. Unless your previous employment required very sophisticated skills or you have extensive training, that simply is not credible. You definitely can’t expect them to take your word for it.
  • Upgrade your skills regularly: Over time, keep adding to your skills as part of your job interview preparation. You don’t need to wait until a prospective employer gives you a reason to add the skill. Free training, including videos on YouTube and books at your local library, is widely available,! When you can demonstrate another skill, upgrade your skills list.
  • Create a demonstration document that you could bring with you to the job interview or even email in advance. For example, find a simple text version of a classic novel or other public domain document. Reformat the document, demonstrating the full range of Intermediate and Advanced Skills in Microsoft Word 2010. Create a new PDF file with an index to examples in the document of each of the skills you are claiming. Bring that PDF file with you on an inexpensive USB drive that you can leave behind at the end of the interview!

Prepare for Job Interview Questions on Microsoft Office Skills

Job seekers need to arrive at the job interview prepared to respond appropriately for all predictable questions. To do that, reassure a prospective employer that you have the up-to-date Microsoft Office skills, especially if those qualifications wouldn’t be indicated by previous work experience. The checklists in the MS Office Skills Checklists section of this site can help you to credibly communicate.

Does all this sound like a lot of work? I’m not suggesting that it isn’t, but it may set you apart from the competition. Don’t just claim your qualifications. Use the checklists to prove them!

Do you have other suggestions? Please let me know!

Check out this Slideshare presentation on how these checklists can benefit you!