Monthly Archives: September 2013

Research the Employer Before the Interview

When you don’t research the employer before the interview, your superficial research downgrades your answers to every question, disappoints prospective employers and shortchanges you. Take the time, leave your comfort zone, and learn everything you can.

As John headed back to his car after a grueling interview, he was elated. Always optimistic, he usually thought it had gone very well. The panel of interviewers seemed to like his responses to their questions, and he had a good feeling about his chances.

Finally, it was coming together for John. He was proud of the fact that he had taught himself the ins and outs of the plant manager role with a small town manufacturer before it was sold a year ago. Now he felt ready for a big break, bringing his skills and knowledge to a national firm. This position brought a higher salary, opportunities for promotion and improved benefits, just in time for the baby coming in a couple of months.

Thorough Research Before the Job Interview is essential

Research Before Interviews

Back inside, Sherman was puzzled. Something was lacking in John’s answers. John undoubtedly had solved some challenging problems with a shoestring budget. But it was harder to visualize him working in the department. His stories placed him in an environment entirely unlike this one. No more walking into the president’s office and demanding immediate approval for new equipment. If he was hired, could John adjust?

John is oblivious. The very idea that his limited knowledge of even basic differences between his former employer and this new one could undermine his credibility would never occur to him.

For that reason, John didn’t sell himself as effectively as he might have.

Good research distinguishes you from less prepared candidates

The first time I was asked what I had done to prepare for an interview, I was startled by the question. During my academic career, that would never be asked. The truth was, I had done very little to learn about the organization. It simply never occurred to me that I was expected to research the employer before the interview! Frankly, that sounded like a lot of unnecessary work.

The power of thorough, in-depth research to distinguish you from the other applicants, and to overcome biases cannot be overstated. There would have been concerns about John’s suitability just from looking at his resume, but careful preparation of responses that were designed to suit the actual workplace of the prospective employer would have reassured the interview panel.

Possibly even if John did know that he needed to adapt his answers for this specific company, he might have dismissed the idea of spending that much time in preparation for one interview. So the payoff needs to be high. Continue reading

Prepare for “How did you prepare for this interview” Job Interview Question

Kill the interview or boost your hiring prospects right here and now. Interviewers can tell when you haven’t prepared. That’s deadly for positions above entry-level.

It’s typically asked right after “Tell Me About Yourself”. Last post, I talked about how powerfully you can impact the interviewer’s perception of you as a candidate. With this question, the prospective employer continues to size you up.

Read on to deepen your understanding of the “how did you prepare for this interview” job interview question.

A Most Revealing Question: How Did You Prepare for this Interview?

Did you take this interview seriously? Do you prepare at all for important assignments? What does it look like when you really prepare?

Many applicants, particularly above the entry-level positions, have rehearsed answers for other questions. You might take this one lightly, guessing (wrongly) that there wouldn’t be much payoff if you you thoroughly “prepare for this interview”.

What Does The Employer Want/Need to Hear?

They want to know what you’ve learned about the company, even if they don’t specifically say that. Show them your findings that aren’t available just by looking at the company’s website or the first page of Google. The amount of effort you put in and the savvy that you demonstrate by your research approach convey much. Continue reading

Prepare for the “Tell Me About Yourself” Job Interview Question

Back up a great first impression with a solid answer to the first job interview question, “tell me about yourself”.  Meet the interviewer’s need for info your resume didn’t nail. Let them visualize you adding real value and fitting in the first morning!

 “Tell Me About Yourself” Is Not An Icebreaker!

For experienced interviewers, it is a very purposeful job interview question and your response matters to them and therefore to you.

Your response should be just as purposeful and strategic. Your resume gave the interviewer a positive but vague view of your potential. Now she needs clarity and still has some doubts.

Anticipate her questions,  resolve them now, then take a deep breath. Continue reading